Thanks to the Fuss Free Foodie for her latest creation with Friels Vintage Cider!

Serves 2

  • 160mls Friels Vintage cider
  • 600mls vegetable stock
  • 35g butter (15g/20g)
  • 1 garlic clove, finely minced
  • 1 small onion, finely diced (approx. 50g)
  • 150g risotto rice (I used carnaroli)
  • 150g butternut squash, peeled and finely diced
  • 40g Parmesan cheese
  • 45g goats cheese, diced
  • Salt and pepper

Pangrattato

  • 8-10 sage leaves
  • 20g walnuts
  • 20g stale bread
  • ¼ garlic, grated
  • ¼ lemon, zest grated
  • 2 tbsps. olive or rapeseed oil
  1. Add the stock and cider into a pan and bring to the boil. Set aside.
  2. In another pan add 15g of the butter and melt. Add the onion and cook on a low to medium heat for about 8 minutes until the onion is translucent. Add the garlic and cook for 2 further minutes.
  3. Add the rice to the pan. Stir and coat it in the butter. Season with 3 or 4 twists of salt and 2 or 3 of pepper. Add in the diced squash and stir, then add 2 ladles of stock and stir again.
  4. Stir the pan every 3 or 4 minutes until the stock has disappeared, then add 2 more ladles. I don’t stir continuously! Continue repeating this process for around 20-22 minutes.
  5. Whilst the risotto is absorbing the stock, make the pangrattato. On a board, chop the bread, walnuts and sage as fine as you can (or pulse in a small blender). Add the garlic and lemon and chop through one more time.
  6. In a frying pan on a medium to high heat, add 2 tablespoons of oil. Add the pangrattato mixture and stir it into the oil. Stir regularly to avoid it burning for 5 or 6 minutes or until it is golden brown. Set aside.
  7. After around 20-22 minutes and the stock has nearly all been used, try 1 grain of rice and assess the texture of the risotto rice. If there is a chalky bit in the middle, the rice needs to cook for a couple more minutes. If it has a firm bite without it being crunchy, the rice is ready. You don’t want a mush, so keeping checking every minute or two until you reach the ‘al dente’ texture.
  8. Add the remaining butter (20g) to the risotto and stir until it is melted and mixed in. Take the risotto off the heat now and stir in the Parmesan. If the risotto is too thick, add a little more stock if there is any left. You want the risotto to fall easily off the wooden spoon. (Use a splash of hot water if the stock has run out).
  9. Serve the risotto onto your dish or plate. Add the goats cheese on top, then sprinkle over the pangrattato; This will add a lovely additional dimension to each mouthful of the risotto!

Click here to watch on youtube. Alternatively, click here to have a look at other recipes by The Fuss Free Foodie involving ciders from our members!

WordPress Lightbox Plugin